CCB Graduates

 

Class of 2017: Looking Back to Look Forward

 

Q: What's next? 

What's Next?

 

Q: What will you miss most?

The vast majority of our students answered with their version of "My Lab." Some specifically named their colleagues and advisors, their "group family," their "labmates and friends." Some, no doubt those traveling across the country, will miss Boston. Some, their experience teaching undergraduates.

One graduate, with especial appreciation, will miss "the visionary guidance and tremendous support from my advisor, Charlie (Professor Charles Lieber), the interactive and collaborative research environment with faculties all over Harvard, the brilliant and hard working colleagues, the extremely helpful administrative staffs, and all the good friends I made."

 

 

"There are many reasons to look back fondly on my time in CCB: I learned about the challenges and excitement of teaching tenacious undergraduates; that you may need to learn many new skills in order to address the research questions you're faced with, that your research can lead you down paths you may previously have never considered; and that waking up before dawn to row on the Charles is a great way to bring balance to my life and help me overcome the challenges faced in the lab." 

 

Q: What will you remember most about your time here?

CCB Graduate Students

"Meeting my fiance!"

"The joy of mentoring students and watching them grow."

"Helping discover a new target for an old drug."

"Interdisciplinary research can be surprisingly exciting and fruitful."

"The importance of picking the right problem to work on as a synthetic chemist."

"I hadn't really been tested before graduate school, and it was interesting finding out what I am (and am not) capable of."

"Switching research fields from theoretical chemistry to computational genetics."

"More than any one scientific finding, the 'discovery' of how to think, experiment, and communicate incisively and creatively stands out. The approach to the scientific process I cultivated at Harvard will shape my work for the rest of my career."